Round One

The Board Game Workshop Design Contest 2019

Entering Round One

Submissions for round one open March 17, 2019 and close April 21, 2019.

To enter round one you will need to submit the following:

Pay the $5 fee

Buy your entry ticket here. After you buy the ticket you will get a link to the submission form. If the $5 fee is an impediment to you entering the contest, please contact me at chris@theboardgameworkshop.com.

Submission Form

Once you purchase your ticket you should receive a message with a link to the submission form. Contact me at chris@theboardgameworkshop.com if you have any problems.

The form will ask for: 

  • Your email address to communicate about the contest. 
  • Your order number from your ticket. If you ordered multiple tickets in one order for multiple submissions, you will use the same order number for each.
  • The name of all the game’s designers. 
  • The name of your game.
  • A short description of your game. (500 character limit. See below.)
  • A link to your 2 minute pitch video. (2 minute maximum. See below.)

Short Description

The short description is possibly the most difficult part of the entire contest. You only have 500 characters to describe your game.

The purpose of the short description is to quickly describe your game for the judges looking at the list of entries. The judges will decide which pitch videos to watch based on the designer names, game names, and short descriptions. It doesn’t need to explain game play or go into any detail. It is your opportunity to make sure the judges that love games like yours watch your video. Get across the main hook of your game as simply as possible.

2 Minute Pitch Video

The 2 minute video is the focus of your round one submission. The only requirement is that it is no longer than 2 minutes. Submissions with videos longer than 2 minutes will not be accepted. The content of the video is up to you, so the rest of this is just suggestions.

Two minutes may seem very short but you can get a lot of information into that if you plan ahead. Remember that you have two minutes of video and two minutes of audio. If you are showing your game while explaining it, you can get across a lot more information and it’s more interesting to watch. Judges want to see your game. If your video is just you talking to the camera about your idea, it will not grab their attention as much.

Plan what you will say in your video and practice it. If you can’t edit your video, you will need to focus more on getting your timing perfect. Make sure you can get across all of the important points before you bother getting into details.

Don’t just go with your first attempt. Shoot your video again and again to practice and to get the best take. 

Editing your video gives you a lot more control and can help get the most information into your 2 minutes. If you are not familiar with video editing you may be able to find local resources at a library, school, or community tv station. Two free options for editing software are Adobe Spark Video and DaVinci Resolve.

Your entry will be judged on the following.

  • Innovation: Does the game do something new or combine things into a new and unique experience?
  • Elegance: Does the game flow smoothly and not get in the way of the fun?
  • Excitement: How excited are you to play the game?
  • Presentation: Was the information presented clearly?
  • Overall: How much do you like the game overall?

Make sure that your video highlights those aspects of your game. You will not be directly judged on the quality of your video but better presentation makes it easier for the judges to understand.

Judging Round One

All of the judges will have access to the full list of submissions. They will choose which entries they want to judge based on the game’s name, designers’ names, and the short description. Near the end of judging, judges will focus on games that received less views.

Once a judge has chosen a video to watch, they view the video and then fill out the judging form for that game.

They will rate the game from 1 to 5 in five categories.

  • Innovation: Does the game do something new or combine things into a new and unique experience?
  • Elegance: Does the game flow smoothly and not get in the way of the fun?
  • Excitement: How excited are you to play the game?
  • Presentation: Was the information presented clearly?
  • Overall: How much do you like the game overall?

They will also give some written feedback.

The combined rating for all five categories is the game’s score from that judge. The lowest score a game can receive is 5 and the highest score is 25. The scores from all of the judges that judged a game will be averaged to get that game’s final score. 

Once all the scores are calculated, the ranking of games along with their final scores will be published to the site and each entrant will be emailed their detailed scores which includes individual scores and written feedback from the judges.

The top 20 games will move onto round two.

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